Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
FBC 4
CSPAN 3
CNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CNNW 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
: good morning, everybody. today is december lenth, 2012. >> steve: 2012. >> gretchen: i am gretchen carlson. sorry kids. you don't have to go to school today. michigan teachers fighting against the bill that gives workers the right to not pay dues. >> steve: washington can't find a solution to the fiscal cliff . but someone who fixed budgets in the past know it is simple. >> if i raise taxes again i will have to do it in two or four years . people are going to leave. >> steve: find out how america's mayor did it straight ahead. straight ahead. feel a cold coming on? gretchen, you will be better in no time. we'll drink to that. >> you will be better in no time and all of my teases will rhyme today. "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> steve: ho, ho, hompt look who is here today eric boling. >> gretchen: you get your own personal lurch. >> eric: good to be here. >> steve: you will find out how booze, beer and wine can make you healthier. the news we have all waited for. >> gretchen: yeah, a lot of people waking up with a headache. now it makes sense why i
and steve moore from the "wall street journal" steve, seems like you are the guy that likes our ghost buster, fed buster guy. >> i was shocked by the decision. is this qe inifiti we're on right now? melissa: i don't know. >> we've had such a huge deluge of liquidity into the market. and the fed, a lot of people know this that the fed already owns about a trillion dollars worth of federal 30-year treasury securities on its book and it will now purchase 40 billion more a month. that is fancy way of saying what we're doing right now, melissa, we're monetizing our debt. melissa: yeah. >> treasury department is issuing the debt and federal reserve is purchasing the debt and purchases that debt by printing money. melissa: nariman, a lot of people expected before the announcement today they would say they're backing off. instead they said they will target the unemployment rate, you know as if this would give them license to go on morph longer. were you surprised and do you think it's a good idea? do you think steve is right that we're just monetizing debt? >> let's start off with, no we were not su
on the deal, we're joined by virgin atlantic ceo steve ridgeway. steve, welcome to the program, thank you for coming on. >> hello, good afternoon. melissa: how will customers and shareholders know the difference or notice the difference now that we are seeing this portion of the company over to delta, what will feel different? >> i think we are a very strong airline. we started the heritage. delta likewise. delta has a huge presence in the u.s. but putting operations and schedules together, we have to get a deal approved which is obviously delta buying singapore's stake. and then we would create a joint venture across the north atlantic with antitrust abuse. we can coordinate our schedules and make sure we can bring together a bigger network for our customers and potential customers to fly on. it is very positive news with two good airlines coming together. really offering more choices to consumers. melissa: what do you make in choice? how dull the pain 360 million. quite a difference, what do you make of that? >> i think yes, it certainly is. it is the reality of the world we live in. th
with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus in the long run. >> woodruff: what is known about the evidence that this is a serious threat that they may turn to chemical weapons? >> the intentions of the gime re uncertain. i don't think anybody knows what bashar al as
and "morning joe" economic analyst. steve brattner. >> he came with charts. willie, do you have a chart? >> no. >> he's disturbed. i don't know if you heard this. has he done this to you? >> we have two obesity stories we have to get to. we're not going to break. >> stalling right now. >> the filibuster reform should be passed but not passed yet. our executive producer, alex, comes up to me this morning. like the syndrome, you stay here long enough start walking with a strut. alex corson, hey, call me acc 47. >> he's getting bold. >> yes! >> is that like a phil cavens thing? >> yes! >> i'm like, seriously, karins? so phil cabins? >> the baseball announcer in high school called him phil cabins. that stuck with him. >> think of all the things you've been called. >> i'm called that everyday. apparently i said something yesterday. >> what did you do? >> something about -- >> did you get in trouble? i don't know. i got a call from hugh hewitt. >> the radio guy? >> he's like, did you -- i just want to talk about what you said today. it was like 7:30 at night, the kids are running around, you know. i
they are not going anywhere unless and until the president cancels his plans to place himself above the law. steve hair tan live for news cairo. steve? >> shepard, this is really a new tactic for the opposition protesters. instead of simply staying here in tahrir square and chanting they went on offensive tonight toward the presidential palace. they got right to the compound walls until being tear gassed. it was reenergized the opposition. we have seen increase in recent days now they are out in full force. one factor to keep in mind about the demonstrations today, there were no serious injuries reported. despite the scenes of chaos, both sides evidently still using some restraint. next on the agenda of vote december 15th on a constitution heavily criticized as a rush job that favors islamist parties. it's clear the muslim brotherhood will try and get out a strong yes vote on that constitution. what's not clear is the opposition's tactics. will they try to get out a no vote or will they abstain considering the whole process unjust? shepard, back to you? >> steve harrigan live tonight in cairo. the
about israel and how many times they moved the red line. >> steve, the interesting thing about this syrian situation is there could be other kcountries that decide to act militarily or there could be a coalition that does this. it won't have to be the united states alone. yesterday we had goldberg on, your colleague at the atlantic, who reported israel is preparing, turkey is preparing. i also assume at this point the tax cutter, uae, the gulf states would participate in something like this as well. what do you know and what are you hearing? >> well, i think that's right and i think the right model to think about is libya and what you have in libya and what you may have in syria is essentially an atrocity driven strategy. in other words you get right to the edge of, you know, a benghazi wipeout or a potential real use of chemical weapons and then that drives the coalition response. i think it's highly doubtful that the qatar would take action but highly probable a calculation that involves turkey and thus nato forces were to take action if chemical weapons were to be used and i
. >> steve sedgwick has the latest and joins us now. hi, steve. >> i like that shuffle, steve. that was good. >> reporter: i've got a treat for you. guys, kelly, ross, i've got a treat. the nigerian oil minister has asked me kindly to join -- you are absolutely freezing. thank you very much for joining us. i know you've got a very important meeting coming up. how do you feel about world oil supplies at the moment? >> well, i think right now we're holding fairly stable. we're of course concerned that there will be a certain level of overproduction over the next 18 months or so if the production continues. >> reporter: saudi arabia need to take oil off the table cd iraq? >> i think those are issues we'll discuss today. >> reporter: what is the most contentious issue? we have been saying the most contentious issue could surround saudi arabia and iran. some estimates of over one million barrels a day. >> again, i would not preempt this meeting and outcome by giving statistics at this point. i think it's critical that we go in and have discussions amongst ourselves and come to the sort of prudent
're going to hear tomorrow, in the next hour, when steve liesman will join us with results of our fed survey. >>> an oh beck minister, important events. opec ministers are in vienna. >> why vienna, by the way? >> i don't know why they originally set it there, but it seems like as good a place as any. have you been? >> i have not been. >> i don't think i've ever been to vienna. i always wondered about that. >> i mean, it's better than meeting in, i don't know, skokie, right? they're expected to retain its 28 million barrel a day output target. but the real drama is likely to be about leadership, the world's leading oil exporters are expected to argue about who should be opec's next secretary general and we have candidates from iran, iraq and saudi ara a arabia. they're all competing to replace the current leader, as you can see there. abdallah salem el badri, he's 72 years old and he's been there for years. i don't know where i've been for five years, but did you know -- >> i apologize in advance. i didn't. >> you could have said you did and we've been best friends, in fact. >> he's complete
from steve cook, head of the michigan education association was a guest on our program. the union leadership was working, meeting with governor schneider and he said no the last thing i want is -- i don't want to split this state the way they did in wisconsin and ohio. no no, no. i don't want anything to do with that. i want to work together with the unions. i don't want anything to do with this rumors that they might try to pass some so-called right-to-work legislation in michigan. they met for like about ten days and then on friday, the republican-controlled legislature forced through -- get this now -- with no public hearings no debate on the floor, no members of the public allowed to testify for it or against it, no members of the public even allowed in the state capitol building when they passed this bill it would make michigan the 24th state to have the so-called right-to-work legislation on the books. they forced it through and then rick sha nidor in a total turnaround, a total flip-flop a total doubl
williams, remember, and pointed this out yesterday steve jobs told president obama, those manufacturing jobs are never going to be here in the united states. tim cook says, well, guess what? i am taking al company in a different direction. >> in many ways one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden is that he told me on a couple of pages before he passed away to never question what he would have done. never asked a question what steve do, to just do what's right. >> so there was no wwsd. just do the right thing. now, here is where i disagree with tim cook a little bit. he said, here's why we haven't done this earlier. >> honestly, it's not too much about price. it's about the skills, et cetera. over time, there are skills that are associated with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people but the education for producing. >> now, you see, i disagree with that. the skills are here americans can make these products. they can make them as good and better earn anybody in the entire world. we have a great skilled workforce
. steve hair began with more from the -- herrigan with more from florida. >> reporter: he finds new ways to tell his story, this time streaming live from inside a detention center in guatemala. he took the occasion really to knock down reporters that he may have had a heart attack. insed, he said the symptoms he suffered were simply the result of stress from three weeks on the run. >> the problem i had the other day is i did not eat for two days. i drank very little liquids and for the first time in many years, i've been smoking almost non-stop. i stood up, passed out, hit my head on the wall. came to in total confusion. i am fine now. >> reporter: so the man who chronicled every move of his three week escape from belize including the disguises he wore is now continuing to tell that story from inside detention. >> shepard: the same man who has been described by many as a pathological liar said he wants to come back to the united states. is there a chance of that. >> reporter: no in the short-term. he's in an extradition battle. if he goes back to belize, if he's forced to go back, he'll
to build sand walls as high as 22 feet. but some critics, including steve ellis of taxpayers for common sense, call it a beach bailout. >> what we need do is actually reorient the funding so that the majority of the cost is picked up by the localities rather than the federal taxpayer and when you look at sea level rise, we are in a situation where we're not going to be able to hold back the ocean with just sand anymore. >> sandy was ferocious. >> reporter: jeff davis agreed with neighbors who opposed the dunes because they restrict beach access and blocked views. what he sees today has changed his mind. >> can i put that crow down that i'm eating? ( laughs ) >> reporter: president obama has requested that congress allocate $60 million for hurricane sandy aid-- an unspecified amount will go toward rebuilding protective dunes washed away by sandy. seth doane, cbs news, long beach island, new jersey. >> pelley: there was an unusual murder yesterday in a high-rent section of new york city in broad daylight in front of hundreds of witnesses. investigators say it looks like a professional hit
business network giving you the power to prosper. uncer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's ju common sense, from td ameritrade. dennis: almost a quarter on till. stocks every 15 minutes, nicole is watching. nicole: some big news happen. the two biggest stockholders offering 32 million shares. winding down their interest. this is all about health care. let's take a look at the stock on the move and it has been dropping in the market. looking at the broader market averages talking with the fact we have seen gains across the board, this trend we have seen is quite stellar. this could be our fifth day in a row. you have two gain more than half of a percent on the dow. this will be the longest run since march 15. the nasdaq and a
. they have all of their products now being built in china and tim cooke, who replaced steve jobs and very rarely gave interviews, gave an interview to nbc he announced next year we'll do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. they're going to start creating some jobs here in america. >> bill: you know, that's a bfd. >> great news. >> seriously. >> bill: it is great news. we knew shortly before he died, steve jobs was at a very small dinner of high tech leaders with president obama in silicon valley and steve jobs says those jobs are never coming back, mr. president. stop talking about it. they ain't coming back. >> he was wrong apparently. >> bill: well, that was his policy and now somebody else is in charge. >> this is going to be building apple computers. they're still going to be building iphones and eye pats in china which makes up most of their business but this is a very good first step to bring jobs to america from apple. good for them. >> bill: i wonder where. >> they haven't announced where.
itself nearly killed her. let's bring in emma's oncologist, dr. steve krups, who helped pioneer this ground-breaking treatment as well as cmn correspondent elizabeth cohen. dr. krups, i'm glad to have you here, because i think the first question, where did the idea of using the deactivated version of hiv, where did it even come from in the first place? >> thanks a lot for allowing me to answer your questions. so the treatment that emma got was actually a cell therapy treatment. i think tom and kerry did a great job describing that to folks. what we did was take cells called t-cells, we take those out of the body. we expose them to a virus that we can put a new gene into the t-cells, that's called genetic engineering, then we put the t-cells back in the body, we don't put the virus back in the body. it's true it started out as an hiv virus, and we take out all the parts of the virus that can cause disease and only leave the part that can actually put that new gene into the cell for the genetic engineering. this idea has been around for a while, but it's only recently that this so
that language. i think it is veryytelling where he went today. connell: all right, steve, it is very good to see you. dagen: a new report by the u.s. intelligence reveals china will have the world's largest economy by 2030. the councils global trend report takes into account factors such as localization and the environment. europe, japan and russia are also expected to continue to decline. connell: a matter of time, as they say. this fox business exclusive, we will talk about the war on business. it was a record year for anti-trust funds. dagen: the sanctions against iran. if this policy will change anything over there. the state of the economy and why it matters to you and this, the cost of crude oil. take a look at it. more than $86 a barrel. stubbornly high. ♪ >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life side down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you % today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they caopen bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money
on taxes and what not. >> eric: the reality is, we have a spending problem, steve. how much money we're actually taxing, tax revenues are going up. >> they have to. >> eric: it's a spending issue. if we're putting a trillion dollars into the deficit you can't fix that with taxes. >> no, you sure can't. eric, when i first came to washington, which was about 25 years ago, we barely had a trillion dollar budget and here we are, 25 years later and we're closing in on a 4 trillion dollar budget and that under democrats and republicans as well and there haven't been serious cuts in spending in this town in at least 10 or 15 years and i'm kind of frustrated that neither party is really serious about getting these spending programs under control. i mean, we have been-- you look at entitlement programs and president obama and a lot of democrats say we can't cut medicare, social security, medicaid. and that's half the budget there. of course, we're spending 600, 700 billion dollars a year just to pay the interest on the debt. just on the interest. so you don't get any return on that. one last
was kind of the leader. >> stephanie: i dove donnie. steve doocy. >> europe is great because they have wonderful food and runny cheeses, but we shouldn't base our policies on theirs because they are stinkers. >> we should base it on singapore where they have no unemployment, and they have a competitive market. that protects workers. >> stephanie: we should be like singapore? >> oh my god. holy crap. he is a bigger idiot than i thought. he is not even trying to hide what a douche bag he is. >> stephanie: okay. bill o'reilly. really? is this his whole december? >> there is no doubt that your day you christian tradition in this country is under attack. and people like pastor happy have not to stop. okay. enough. enough. and we need leadership not only in the pulpit but now we are going to need it in the public square. >> after of the judao christian are jewish. you moron. >> stephanie: thank you for that reference. [ applause ] >> stephanie: judao, christian. >> i'm an atheist, i don't care if you have a cross on your property -- i really don't. this whole thing is just
, louisiana. caller: good morning, steve and mona. it's time to stop carrying the water for the white house. with the rebels in damascus, isn't it too late? if you try chemical weapons in his own city, it's going to be worse for him, don't you think? host: is referring to a story that is on politico.com in what a lot of reporters are talking about the inauguration. guest: it's important to underscore the likelihood of assaad using chemical weapons may be quite low because it would, in fact, essentially be a suicide mission given the response it would detract from the international community. that being said, given the arsenal he has a and concerns about chaos in the country, it is a contingency that needs to be planned for. that is why i think we are seeing what we are. president obama's statement, and others after him, were motivated by u.s. intelligence reporting that suggested there was movement and potentially the mixing of precursors of some of these chemical weapons on site. there is concern about what could be happening and whether what they could be preparing. host: off of twitter.
this law. if you look at those on the other side though, and i'm looking at a quote from steve cook, president of the michigan education association. he says this. whether the proponents call this rite to work or freedom to work, it is freedom to freeload. many unions say if they don't have people come in to join the unions, pay dues, necessary, unions lose power. unions in their argument protected working conditions and wages for years in this country. this is the big transition. not only state to go through it. we do expect rick snyder at any moment today to sign this legislation into law. we'll take you back to michigan as we hear more. obviously a lot of people on both sides debating this today. rick: we're all over that important story. we're also following new developments out of north korea and that country's plan to test a long range rocket. the launch was scheduled to happen any day now. north korea dismantling the rocket to take it off the lawn of pad. is the north caving in to international pressure or could this mean something else entirely. >>> also a kansas family murd
and live in an america where they can come true. some of you share passion on this issue. steve scalise, a congressman from louisiana, recently elected as the leader of the republican study committee for the next congress. i yield to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. scalise: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership, not only for hosting this hour but for being so passionate about the need to control spending, and the need to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election,
of chicago economist steve davis and co-authors, where they have this cool new index. it is a very innovative paper. they estimated that debt limit struggle subtracted about 1.5% from g.d.p. growth during that summer when it was happening because of the uncertainty and the inactivity caused by high levels of uncertainty. eve time we go through there, we bear a negative short-run cost. but if that is what it takes to get spending under control, then we have to concede that in the long run there is a benefit that we don't have these massive deficits crowding out long-term growth. the struggle would depending on whether debt reduction buys space for private capital or not. we may have higher economic growth in the long-run because we went through that struggle. >> so your position is we should be ready to go through that struggle again and in fact default on the national debt if necessary in order to enforce spending limits? >> that is of course not my position. my position is we should never default on the national debt. the politics of debt reduction as you all know better than me are very, ve
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)